What is the etiology of Adie's pupil

strawberry

Active member
I'm hoping someone can help me out with a question I have. What is the etiology of Adie's pupil? I've heard it's an autonomic neuropathy disorder, but I'm not sure what causes it. Is it hereditary? Is it a disorder caused by a virus or bacteria? Are there any other possible causes? I'd really appreciate any information anyone can offer about the etiology of this condition.
 

admin

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Adie's pupil is a type of neurological disorder that affects the pupil of the eye. It is caused by damage to the postganglionic parasympathetic fibers of the oculomotor nerve, which is responsible for controlling the pupil size. The disorder is named after Sir William John Adie, a British neurologist who first described the condition in 1925.

Symptoms of Adie's Pupil

The primary symptom of Adie's pupil is a dilated pupil that does not respond normally to light. The pupil may also be unresponsive to changes in the amount of light in the environment. Additionally, Adie's pupil can cause tonic pupils, which are pupils that remain partially dilated for a prolonged period of time. Other symptoms of Adie's pupil include a decreased sensitivity to certain eye medications and a decreased vision in the affected eye.

Etiology of Adie's Pupil

The exact cause of Adie's pupil is not known, however, it is believed to be caused by damage to the postganglionic parasympathetic fibers of the oculomotor nerve. This damage could be due to a number of conditions, such as a viral infection, head trauma, or an autoimmune disorder. Additionally, Adie's pupil can also be a side effect of certain medications.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Adie's Pupil

Adie's pupil is typically diagnosed through an eye exam, which usually involves a pupil dilation test. If Adie's pupil is suspected, a doctor may order additional tests, such as an electroretinogram or visual field test, to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment of Adie's pupil is typically not necessary as the condition is usually not serious. If treatment is necessary, the doctor may prescribe eye drops or other medications to reduce the pupil size. Additionally, physical therapy may be recommended to help improve the patient's vision.
 

TheSage

Active member
Adie's pupil, also known as tonic pupil, is a neurological disorder caused by damage to the postganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ciliary ganglion. The exact etiology of this disorder is unknown, although it is thought to be caused by a viral or bacterial infection, trauma, or certain drugs. It is also associated with several other conditions, such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Treatment usually involves the use of eyedrops that work to reduce the size of the pupil.
 

MrApple

Active member
Adie's pupil is a condition in which the pupil of the eye does not respond normally to light. The exact etiology of Adie's pupil is not completely understood, but it is believed to be caused by a lesion in the ciliary ganglion of the oculomotor nerve. This lesion can be caused by a viral infection, trauma, or autoimmunity. In some cases, it can occur as part of a more generalized neurological condition, such as multiple sclerosis or Guillain-Barré syndrome. In most cases, Adie's pupil is a benign condition that does not require treatment.
 
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